What is Copyright Infringement?

What is Copyright Infringement?

Copyright infringement┬áis using someone else’s work, such as a story, a song, a video, a movie, a piece of art, a photograph, and other creative works, without authorisation or compensation, if compensation is required.

Copyright infringement is using someone else’s work without getting that person’s permission. The author of any original work, including books, essays, Web pages, songs, pictures, and videos, automatically gets the copyright to that work, even if she doesn’t label it with the copyright symbol and her name. The work must be fixed in tangible form, which means it must be stored on something physical, such as paper, canvas, a CD, or a hard disk.

If another person makes copies or exploits a work commercially without the copyright owner’s permission, then this is Copyright infringement. There has to be a “substantially similar” reproduction if infringement is to have occurred. Creating a very similar work independently does not mean there has been infringement. The subsequent work must be copied from the first version made.

The owner of a copyright gets to decide who can legally make copies of that work. It is illegal to copy large sections of someone else’s copyrighted work without permission, even if you give the original author credit.

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