Excesses – Costs Exclusive or Cost Inclusive

Excesses – Costs Exclusive or Cost Inclusive

What is the difference between a “Costs Exclusive” Excess or a “Costs Inclusive” Excess?

When we look at an excess described as Costs Exclusive, we are actually saying that the excess will only apply to the actual settlement of a claim as opposed to a costs inclusive excess which means the excess applies to both the legal costs and the settlement.

The end result should mean that the end result is the same, you pay the excess. Where there is a benefit with a costs exclusive excess is in the timing of when it gets paid (at the timing of settlement) and even better if the matter is successfully defended and there is no settlement. No excess is then paid.

So from this point of view, a “costs exclusive” excess is much better to have but is not always available for most occupations or with most insurers.

Its availability also has a lot to do with market cycles and competition. For instance, the Accounting profession is very competitive at the moment and will offer it, but hard to find for engineers. In a soft market it seems everyone offers a “costs exclusive” excess while in hard market it is a rarity.

A skilled Broker must point out at renewal time if the excess has reverted to “Costs Inclusive” or seek to negotiate with the current insurer its retention. Not pointing out this change will get the Broker into trouble.